Glen Campbell's Studio Sessions

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Re: Glen Campbell's Studio Sessions

Postby Dee » Sun May 21, 2017 12:41 pm

Two more question about the Colley CD (previous post):
is Glen actually on this compilation of demos?
Has anyone come across the session contracts for it if contracts were executed for publishing demos?
Thanks!
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Re: Glen Campbell's Studio Sessions

Postby Dee » Sat May 20, 2017 9:46 am

Hi, arlw!

Thank you so much for confirming that Glen is on Barbara Mandrell's first single, both tracks, as well as providing confirmations for Glen playing on Merle Haggard's Bonnie & Clyde and Paul Petersen's recordings. The bio looks to be a good one with references to Glen's session work and also confirms Glen joined The Champs in 1960!

Perhaps this is a new one for you: have you heard of Keith Colley's release on a 2004 CD titled "Bird Doggin'" under the U.K. Cherry Red label? A description on the back of this CD explains the recordings are early publishing demos with members of "The Wrecking Crew" also including Seals and Crofts, Jerry Fuller, and Glen Campbell.

Below is a screenshot of the description as well as full-size photos of the front and back CD covers. If you have this CD, do the liner notes provide additional details? Such as the year(s) the demos were cut?

Thanks so much for any information you may have on this one. It could be very interesting to listen to!

Dee

Keith Colley_Bird Doggin_description.jpg
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Keith Colley_Bird Doggin_front.jpg
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Keith Colley_Bird Doggin_back.jpg
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Re: Glen Campbell's Studio Sessions

Postby arlw » Sat Apr 29, 2017 4:19 pm

FROM MY COLLECTION--THE BONNIE AND CLYDE IS ON HERE--THIS IS A GREAT WRITE UP----


Glen Campbell In Concert – This CD is still sealed and will remain that way. The CD contains 11 tracks. This Audio CD was released on February 5, 2010. The record label is MAX CAT RECORDS. ASIN-B00378LGXC. The CD cover on the front/back is all blue and Glen Campbell is written in gold. Some biography to go with this CD as Glen will turn 74 on April 22, 2010. This product is manufactured on demand using CD-R recordable media. These tracks have been on many CD’s so that is the reason for leaving this one sealed as they have been heard many times over. (8-85444-26599-0). It isn't accurate to call Glen Campbell "pure country," but his smooth fusion of country mannerisms and pop melodies and production techniques made him one of the most popular country musicians of the late '60s and '70s. Campbell was one of the leading figures of country-pop during that era, racking up a steady stream of Top Ten singles, highlighted by classics like "By the Time I Get to Phoenix," "I Wanna Live," "Wichita Lineman," "Galveston," "Rhinestone Cowboy," and "Southern Nights." Boasting Campbell's smooth vocals and layered arrangements, where steel guitars.

Bounced off sweeping strings, those songs not only became country hits, they crossed over to the pop charts as well, which was appropriate, since that is where he began his musical career. Originally, he was a Los Angeles session musician, playing on hits by the Monkees, Elvis Presley, Frank Sinatra, and Merle Haggard. By the end of the '60s, he had become a successful solo artist, and that success would not abate until the late '80s, when he stopped having radio hits and began concentrating on live performances at his theater in Branson.

Campbell was born and raised in Delight, AR, where he received his first guitar when he was four years old. Learning the instrument from various relatives, he played consistently throughout his childhood, eventually gravitating toward jazz players like Barney Kessel and Django Reinhardt. While he was learning guitar, he also sang in a local church, where he developed his vocal skills. By the time he was 14, he had begun performing with a number of country bands in the Arkansas, Texas, and New Mexico area, including his uncle's group, the Dick Bills Band. When he was 18, he formed his own country band, the Western Wranglers, and began touring the South with the group. Four years later, Campbell moved to Los Angeles, CA, where he became a session musician.

Shortly after arriving in California, Campbell earned the reputation of being an excellent guitarist, playing on records by Bobby Darin and Rick Nelson. In 1960, he briefly joined the instrumental rock & roll group the Champs, who had the hit single "Tequila" two years earlier. The following year, he released his debut single, "Turn Around, Look at Me," on the small Crest label; the single reached number 62 later in the year. By the summer of 1962, he had released "Too Late to Worry -- Too Blue to Cry" on Capitol Records; the single only spent two weeks on the charts, peaking at 76. While he was tentatively pursuing a solo career, Campbell continued to play professionally, most notably for Elvis Presley and Dean Martin. Also in 1962, he played guitar and sang on "Kentucky Means Paradise," a single by the one-off group the Green River Boys, who released an album, Big Bluegrass Special. "Kentucky Means Paradise" became a hit on the country charts, climbing to number 20. Instead of pursuing a full-fledged country career after the single's release, Campbell returned to studio work, and over the next two years he played on sessions by Frank Sinatra ("Strangers in the Night"), Merle Haggard ("The Legend of Bonnie and Clyde"), the Monkees ("I'm a Believer"), the Association, and the Mamas & the Papas, among many others.

Following Brian Wilson's breakdown and retirement from the road in 1965, Glen Campbell became a touring member of the Beach Boys for several months. At the end of his tenure as the group's temporary bassist, the Beach Boys offered him a permanent spot in the band, but he turned them down when they wouldn't allow him to have an equal cut of the group's royalties. A few months after rejecting the band's offer, the Beach Boys' record label, Capitol, offered Campbell a full-fledged contract. His first release under his new long-term Capitol contract was a version of Buffy Sainte-Marie's "The Universal Soldier," which peaked at number 45. For much of 1966, he continued to pursue studio work, but he released "Burning Bridges" toward the end of the year, and it climbed to number 18 on the country charts early in 1967.

During 1967, Capitol pushed Campbell as a country recording artist, and their breakthrough arrived in the late summer when his folky country-pop rendition of John Hartford's "Gentle on My Mind" became a Top 40 hit on both the country and pop charts. By the end of the year, he had released a cover of Jimmy Webb's "By the Time I Get to Phoenix," which reached number two on the country charts, and number 26 on the pop charts. Early in 1968, "Gentle on My Mind" won the Grammy Award for Best Country & Western Recording of 1967. Campbell's success continued in 1968, as "I Wanna Live" became his first number one hit and "Dreams of the Everyday Housewife" reached number three. The following year, CBS television hired him to host the variety show The Glen Campbell Good Time Hour, which became quite popular and helped establish him as not only a country star, but a pop music superstar.

Throughout the late '60s and early '70s, Campbell continued to rack up hit singles, including the number one hits "Wichita Lineman" (1968) and "Galveston" (1969), plus the Top Ten singles "Try a Little Kindness" (1969), "Honey Come Back" (1970), "Everything a Man Could Ever Need" (1970), and "It's Only Make Believe" (1970). In 1968, he began recording duets with Bobbie Gentry, and they had hit singles with their versions of two Everly Brothers songs: "Let It Be Me," which reached 14 in 1969, and "All I Have to Do Is Dream," which peaked at number six in 1970. Also in 1969, he began a film career, appearing in the John Wayne movie True Grit that year and Norwood the following year.
By 1972, Campbell's record sales started slipping. After "Manhattan Kansas" reached number six that year, he had trouble having Top 40 hits for the next two years. Furthermore, his television show was canceled. As his career slowed, he began sinking into drug and alcohol addiction, which continued even through his mid-'70s revival. In 1975, he returned to the Top Ten with "Rhinestone Cowboy," a huge hit that reached number one on both the country and pop charts.

Over the next two years, he had a number of Top Ten country hits, including "Country Boy (You Got Your Feet in L.A.)" and "Don't Pull Your Love"/"Then You Can Tell Me Goodbye," which also reached the pop charts. In 1977, he had his final number one hit with "Southern Nights," which topped both the country and pop charts. Following the success of "Southern Nights" and its follow-up, "Sunflower," Campbell stopped reaching the country Top Ten with regularity, yet he had a string of lesser hits and was an immensely popular performer in concert and television. During the mid-'80s, he experienced a brief commercial revival, as the singles "Faithless Love," "A Lady Like You," and "The Hand That Rocks the Cradle" all reached the country Top Ten. By that time, he had begun to clean up his act. Over the course of the mid-'80s, he kicked his addictions to drugs and alcohol and became a born-again Christian. Appropriately, he began recording inspirational albums, yet he didn't abandon country music. As late as 1989, Campbell's smooth, synth-laden contemporary country-pop was reaching the country Top Ten; his last two Top Ten country hits were "I Have You" (1988) and "She's Gone, Gone, Gone" (1989). Campbell began recording less frequently in the early '90s, especially since he could no longer reach the charts and the radio, since they were dominated by new country artists. Over the course of the decade, he gradually moved into semi-retirement, concentrating on golf and performing at his Goodtime Theater in Branson, MO. In 1994, he published his autobiography, Rhinestone Cowboy. Campbell released a comeback album of sorts, the ironically titled Meet Glen Campbell, produced by Julian Raymond and Howard Willing on Capitol Records in 2008.

This write up is straight from my collection--it basically gives some timeline and tells it like it was at that time. Enjoy.
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Re: Glen Campbell's Studio Sessions

Postby arlw » Sat Apr 29, 2017 3:53 pm

This might help you--from my collection with Paul Peterson AND Barbara Mandrell -ALL 45's--Glen is on ALL of these...


She Can’t Find Her Keys/Very Unlikely - Paul Petersen - The flip side has Shelley Fabares doing a duet. Original Colpix label, division of Columbia records. Glen does studio guitar work on here. CP-620. No date is given. Paul was from the “Donna Reed Show.”

Be Everything To Anyone You Love/Keep Your Love Locked - Original Colpix label, CP-632-Paul Petersen. No date is given. Glen does studio guitar work on here. The release date of this record is 1962.

Goody Goody/Amy - Original Colpix label, CP-676 - Paul Petersen. No date is given. Glen does studio guitar work on here.

Lollipops and Roses/Please, Mr. Sun - Original Colpix label, CP-649. Paul Petersen. No date is given. Glen does studio guitar work on here.

Polka Dots And Moonbeams/The CheerLeader - Original Colpix label, CP-707. Paul Petersen. No date is given. Glen does studio guitar work on here. The numbered records 218 through 223 are all arranged and produced by Stu Phillips. This numbering in here is for my purpose only-collection/release wise. (218-223) are the number of the 45's that come next!

My Dad /Little Boy Sad – Original Colpix label, CP-663. Paul Petersen. Arranged and conducted by Stu Phillips. NO8W-1394. This was released in 1962. Colpix is a division of Columbia Records. N80W-6402. Glen plays studio guitar on here. This 45 has a crack in it, but still plays, a very rare find. If you ever come across this-I highly recommend getting a copy!!!

BARBARA MANDRELL 45:

Queen For A Day/Alone In The Crowd – Barbara Mandrell – this is her first 45 release on Mosrite label. She was 17 years old when this was recorded. Glen Campbell plays guitar on both songs as a studio guitarist. M-190.M-45-200. Mosrite Publishing Company. Produced by Larry Scott. M-45-190. Original release date is 1966. Record is near mint condition. Very rare record to find. Once again--if you find a copy of this-grab it!!


Happy hunting and glad to assist :lol:
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Re: Glen Campbell's Studio Sessions

Postby Dee » Fri Apr 28, 2017 7:45 pm

Posted by breautube on youtube!
Listen to Glen Campbell playing guitar on Barbara Mandrell's first record recorded in 1963.
From November 1987, Glen Campbell pays tribute to Barbara Mandrell on "This Is Your Life", mentioning he played guitar on Barbara's first record from 1963, "Queen for a Day"; after this clip we hear the record itself, followed by its flip side, on which Glen's playing is especially evident, "Alone in the Crowd". - breautube

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Re: Glen Campbell's Studio Sessions

Postby Cowpoke » Sat Mar 18, 2017 11:50 am

Interview with Paul Petersen. He remembers clearly that Glen played guitar on "She Rides With Me", produced by Brian Wilson.

http://www.courierpress.com/story/life/ ... /99207106/

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Re: Glen Campbell's Studio Sessions

Postby Dee » Sat Mar 26, 2016 5:28 pm

Great info on the Merle Haggard / Glen Campbell recordings, ar!
Isn't it curious that Glen sang harmony and was on "Eleven Winners" in 1972? I look forward to listening to it as well as hearing the other tracks.
Perhaps some of the songs are on YouTube.

Ar, thanks a MILLION for posting the link to 706unionavenue.nl.
It could very well take a year to read through all of its webpages!
Great photos, well-researched. I wish we had a website with the same level of detail for Glen Campbell -- all his session work alone could fill pages and pages.
Thanks so much for sharing this resource.
Dee
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Re: Glen Campbell's Studio Sessions

Postby arlw » Fri Mar 25, 2016 3:37 pm

http://www.706unionavenue.nl/64258533


awesome website--could take a year to read it all!!
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Re: Glen Campbell's Studio Sessions

Postby arlw » Fri Mar 25, 2016 3:26 pm

Merle Haggard And The Strangers, "Eleven Winners" - Capitol Records ST-11745 released in 1972. Glen Campbell sings harmony in the song "Carolyn".

I'm A Lonesome Fugitive - Merle Haggard and The Strangers - Capitol Records, ST-2702. Original release from the 60's. Black label. Glen plays guitar and harmonizes on every song on this album.

The Best Of Merle Haggard, SN-16054, A Capitol reissue. Glen does harmony on almost every song on this album. Also guitar work is done by Glen Campbell.

Merle Haggard And The Strangers, "Songs I'll Always Sing" - Capitol Records SABB-11531, a two record set, 1973, 1974, 1977 release. Glen Campbell is heard on the song, "Branded Man", as he does harmony and guitar work, also "Sing Me Back Home", and "I'm A Lonesome Fugitive".

"Sing Me Back Home" - Merle Haggard And The Strangers. Capitol Records ST-2848. Glen does harmony and guitar work on the song, "The Son Of Hickory Holler's Tramp". Original release on black label.

Merle Haggard and the Strangers – Swinging Doors and the Bottle Let Me Down- KOCH/KOC-3-4052-2. Previously released as Capitol ST-2585. This CD was released in 1995 by KOCH International LP-1995 CEMA Special Markets. A Product of CEMA Special Markets, a division of Capitol Records, Inc. All Rights Reserved. The original release of this album is 1966. Credits are listed and Glen Campbell is one of the guitarists on this CD. The CD will remain sealed, for value purposes only.

There are at least 75 LP's/DVD's with Merle Haggard on them along with Glen and others, but didn't post those. The above is from my collection and these are ALL Merle Haggard/Glen Campbell!

HAPPY EASTER!! :D
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Re: Glen Campbell's Studio Sessions

Postby Dee » Fri Mar 25, 2016 9:25 am

Glen Campbell was on guitar, banjo and backup vocals for Merle Haggard's 1968 “The Legend Of Bonnie And Clyde"?
This is interesting information! (Love that song!)

Info sourced from:

Haggard song inspired by love for outlaws
Texarkana Gazette (TX) - March 25, 2016
http://www.pressreader.com/usa/texarkan ... 5/textview

Is there AFM documentation for this information, Cowpoke and Ar?

Thanks!
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